Level K

Level K

 

K is for Kick It Up a Notch!!

 

Well, the introduction of chapter books started in the last level and from now on that will be the focus. There will be examples of other types of books and more non-fiction books. Your child can now form attachments to characters as there are more series, mostly in the form of chapter books, with the same set of characters that your child can read on his own!!! Your child will now be reading books that can truly send them to different worlds and expand his imagination. The goal here is to now have your child read in his head, or as we say in class without the words coming out. This is the final step to reading like a grown-up. The caution here is that as your child makes this transition to reading in his head the reading might be slower and your child might have to stop more to make sure that he understands what he is reading. Sometimes some kids get a little nervous about this because they have been sailing along and now have to slow down a little. The explanation you can tell your child is that adults do not read out loud and now that he is SO smart that he should try to read like a grown up. There are times when grown-ups reread and have to read out loud to understand and that is ok. This is the ultimate moment when your child uses all that has been learned and now is ready to handle new and exciting texts. Children need to spend most of their time reading creating meaning and movies in their heads while monitoring if all is going well while reading. Another area where there could be some trips is with vocabulary that is specific to the topic. This shows up in non-fiction books as children are introduced to more science and technical words. Children now will be asked to use diagrams and captions to help them understand the facts and those new fancy science words. One of the best ways to combat this is to just read, read, READ so that your child has a wealth of information in his brain to use in these situations. Welcome to your child’s new world of reading!!

 

What your child is learning here:

1. Solve difficult words with relative ease by switching vowel sounds on his own and using all of the strategies that have been learned. Most importantly, your child can recognize that something is not right and independently tries to fix the error.

       What you can say:

  • Every part of a word(syllable) in a long word has a vowel. Let me show you how that can help you take apart a word. (Then cover each part and help your child to figure out the parts.)
  • Read this again and see if you can fix this word before you read on.
  • Something wasn’t quite right. Go back and see if you can find it.
  • You fixed this word all by yourself…Awesome!!

2. Discover the meanings of new words by thinking about the story, using diagrams or other illustrations, and his own experiences or folders in his head.

       What you can say:

  • Read back and read ahead a little to see if it helps you figure out what that word says/means.
  • What does the author tell you in the story that helps you know about that word?
  • Do you know a word like that one that means the same thing?
  • How can you helpyourself understand that that means?
  • When you read things such as; “The boat cut deep waves in the lake.” “I can land my own fish.” “My sister is fond of fish.” How can you figure out what the words (cut, land, and fond) really mean?

3. Reads with fluency, uses expression, and can explain what is happening in the story and new material learned.

       What you can say:

  • Use the punctuation in this part to help you read this like you were telling a story.
  • Model for your child how to stress certain words (like ones in all capitals or italicized), pausing at commas, and responding to periods.
  • Read this part again trying to read in longer bunches.
  • Read that again and try to sound like the character.
  • Reread a part pretending that a character was different.
  • Act out stories or make puppet shows or plays.
  • Ask your child to retell a part of the story just read or the whole story.
  • What are you picturing in your head?
  • How did your ideas( about the character, story, etc.) change as you read the whole book?
  • Stop and think about what’s going on in the story.
  • Predict what is going to happen next in the story.
  • What is the main idea the author is trying to give us?
  • What was the problem in this story and how was it solved? If the problem was not solved, why not?
  • What does the author what us to think/feel/believe about the story/character/information?
  • What are three things that you learned that you did not know before?