Level J

Level J

 

J is for Just Bring on the Non-Fiction!!

 

While the books on this level are similar in length to the books on the I level, your child now is diving head first into all aspects of non-fiction with moving up to Level J! It is a good thing that all year long there have been lots of “swimming lessons”. There really is no topic off limits. Not only are there more opportunities for your child to learn new and exciting facts but also to read biographies or stories about real people. What is great about reading biographies, is that these books give your child the opportunity to identify with someone that they are like or want to be like. Establishing connections to what we read maintains our interest and allows us to make an emotional investment in what we read. In addition to this new addition to your child’s reading repertoire, the sentences in all books at this level are longer and require your child to think about what is read for a longer period of time. The movies that readers at this level make in their minds are getting more complex and full of action. Your child here needs to continue to work on reading for understanding and thinking about all facets of a story. All kinds of words are thrown at your child and with all that he knows he can handle it like a pro! The continued focus with the jump into non-fiction is figuring out what words mean and summarizing what has been learned. Your child can handle it…so just bring it!

 

What your child is learning here:

1. Your child here is now required to communicate about what is read. This could be a summary of the top three things learned in the text or the order of events in the story or explaining why a character chose to do something and how it affected the rest of the story. In other words, get your child talking about the story as much as possible.

          What you can say:

  • Ask your child to retell a part of the story just read or the whole story.
  • What are you picturing in your head?
  • How did your ideas( about the character, story, etc.) change as you read the whole book?
  • Stop and think about what’s going on in the story.
  • Predict what is going to happen next in the story.
  • What is the main idea the author is trying to give us?
  • What was the problem in this story and how was it solved? If the problem was not solved, why not?
  • What does the author what us to think/feel/believe about the story/character/information?
  • What are three things that you learned that you did not know before?

2. Independently uses all sources of information as reading (sounding out words, what is going on in the story, what sounds right, and does it make sense) in order to figure out the text.  There are so many things going on in your child’s head here that would take forever to explain, so all you can say is WOW!! What a sophisticated reader!!

          What you can say:

  • Read back and read ahead a bit to see if it helps you figure out what that word says/means.
  • Have you ever seen that word somewhere you have visited?
  • What does the author tell you in the story that helps you know about that word?
  • Do you know a word like that one that means the same thing?
  • How can you help yourself understand what that means or says?

3. Figures out words calmly and independently as the need arises. Your child does not need as much if any prompting in order to figure out a word because he has the proper set to tools to handle any job.

          What you can say:

  • Let me remind you how we break a word into parts.
  • How does meaning change when you add “-er” or “-est” to a word?
  • Read this again and see you can fix this word before you read on.
  • Something wasn’t quite right. Go back and see of you can find it.
  • You fixed this word all by yourself! You are awesome!!

4. Reads with wonderful fluency so much that you forget that you are listening to a First Grader! Your child can read for punctuation and mood which shows that your child IS understanding what he reads. WOWIE WOW WOW!

          What you can say:

  • Use the punctuation in this part to help you read this like you were telling a story.
  • Model for your child how to stress certain words (like ones in all capitals or italicized), pausing at commas, and responding to periods.
  • Read this part again trying to read in longer bunches.
  • Read that again and try to sound like the character.
  • Reread a part pretending that a character was different.
  • Act out stories or make puppet shows or plays.