Level H

Level H

 

H is for Hooray for Higher Thinking!

 

Hooray! Hooray!! Reading is in full swing and boy is your child flying high! Stories are getting more complex and more technical. Your child is starting to read more non-fiction stories and learning so many facts in the process!! You probably will be treated to many facts about animals, space, and whatever other topic your child finds interesting! This is a time when we can start finding books about topics that your child is interested in and that she can read!! What a great way to learn. The pictures are less and less so that your child has to now make a movie in her head in order to picture the story and make connections to her own experiences in life. Since there is no repetition in the stories, your child has to hold on to the events in the story in her head in order to understand the story. There is more dialogue. There is a serious shift from figuring out words by sounding out to now a greater need for comprehension and meaning. The words are more complex by having more parts. The Word Wall words really come into play now because they should be automatic so that the reader can be more focused on the meaning of the story. This is truly a turning point and we want to say “Hooray!!” for a great reader!

 

What is your child learning here?

 

1. Picture the story in your mind in order to make a movie because there are little pictures. This is where the idea of liking the book better than the movie because of the image in your mind starts.

          What you can say:

  1. Because there are no pictures, let’s get a picture in our mind for what’s going on. I’ll start…
  2. Stop and picture what’s going on here…
  3. What are you thinking?

2. Keep the events of the story in your mind as you are reading in order to understand what is happening in the story. Here is where we start focusing on the “big events” of the story instead of telling each and every part and “little detail” from the story. For example, when you are an adult you can keep the story going from chapter to chapter as you are reading. We are going to start developing this skill now.

          What you can say:

  1. Are you making a picture in your mind of what this is about?
  2. Stop the child at the end of several paragraphs or pages and ask what is happening at that point in the story.
  3. This part is like another story we’ve read, remember….
  4. Is this a “big event” or a “little detail”?”
  5. Let’s think about this section and look back through the pages to help us think about what happened so far in the story. You can use the 5ws (who, did what, when , where, and why).

3. Defining words that there is even trouble pronouncing, telling why things have happened, and seeing past the story events to discuss ideas and events that are directly stated in the story, especially with non-fiction (or true/factual books). This is a defining area of this level. Your child now will be committed to all of the other layers of a story instead of just figuring out words. Can you believe this???

          What you can say:

  • Did you try all the different sounds of the letters to help you with that word?
  • You are checking all the parts of the word, but think about what is going on in the story to figure out what it is.
  • What does the author tell you in the story that helps you know what that word (or group of words or concepts) means?
  • Do you know a word like that one that means the same thing?
  • We’ve read a book that was written just like this part.
  • What do we know about the information in the beginning part of the sentence, when the author uses the word “but” (or “because”).
  • Think about how this kind of book goes… how does that help you understand?

4. Stops and self-corrects right when a mistake is made.

          What you can say:

  • Read this again and see if you can fix this word before you read on.
  • Something wasn’t quite right. Go back and see if you can find it.
  • You fixed this word immediately, great job! Tell me what happened.

5. Reads with fluency and sound oh so professional with expression.

          What you can say:

  • Uses the punctuation in this part to help you read this like you are telling a story.
  • Read this apart again remembering to read in phrases.
  • Make a picture inyour mind about what is going on in this part of the story, then reread this and make the words tell what is happening in the story.
  • Does your reading sound like you are on TV telling a story?