Level G

Level G

 

G is for Great New Adventures!

 

That’s right. Great adventures are out there for your child to encounter all because he has moved on to a new reading level. There are new types of books that are available on this level such as more non-fiction (factual stories, simple fantasy, folktales, and more realistic fiction which is a made up story that could really happen. Again, your child will need to use all that he has in his brain to organize the information that he is reading in order to understand the story and the author’s message. There is little to no patterns. There is more print on the page with there being more lines and the font getting smaller. Due to the foundation that your child now has, there are some reading behaviors that should be automatic so that your child can concentrate on the more complex tasks of words with those strange spelling patterns that just do not make sense, stories that have more than one level, and vocabulary that requires the child to start working on what the word means. Your child’s fluency, or pace and expression when reading, should start to increase because there are more words in his brain that he can recognize automatically, he has a set of strategies to figure out words that is just second nature, and an understanding of characters and punctuation so that he can use voices and expression. There are some moments in class when it is truly remarkable to hear your child read because it sounds so professional! The voices can really crack you up. Join us for the great adventures that are ahead in this new level!!

 

What is your child learning here?

1. Reading more difficult words as well as names is becoming easier for your child. This is because your child has a tool box full to help figure out words while understanding what is happening in the story.

      What you can say:

  • Did you check across the word to make sure all parts are correct?
  • Move your eyes across the word checking each part.
  • What did you do to help yourself?
  • Go back to the beginning of the sentence and think about what’s going on in this part to figure out what that word means.
  • Did you ever see that word before in a story or somewhere you’ve visited?
  • What does this mean?

2. Use parts from known words to read unknown words.

          What you can say:

  • Find a part you know and use it for the new word.
  • Take a closer look at this part (because you know that it resembles a Word Wall Word).

3. Beginning to check if what is read matches the page independently as soon as the mistake happens. Some rereading and skipping to go on may be necessary.

          What you can say:

  • Read this again and see if you can fix this word before you read on. (point to the tricky word)
  • You reread and fixed this word. What helped you?
  • Something wasn’t quite right. Go back and see if you can find it.
  • You fixed this word immediately. Tell me what happened.

4. Use more than one strategy to figure out words and what is going on in the story, check to make sure that what is read makes sense and sounds right. The number one rule is that stories need to makes sense!!

          What you can say:

  • This is like another story we’ve read. Which one?
  • You are thinking about the story… are you checking the pictures?
  • You are checking the pictures…are you thinking about the story?
  • What do you know that can help you here?
  • Go back to the beginning of the sentence, think about what is going on in the story, then predict what the word might be.
  • Think about what’s going on in this part to figure out what that word means.
  • What does that mean?

5. Read with more fluency and some expression as the story is reread. Your child is reading more and more like a professional. Can you believe how fancy your child sounds?

          What you can say:

  • Listen to me read it with voices and now you try.
  • Use your voice to change the character to show me that someone is happy, sad, mad, etc.
  • Let’s read the story using different voices.
  • Make reading sound like you are telling a story.