Level F

Level F

             

F is for Fancy Reading and Thinking

 

Can you believe that your child is ready to do some fancy reading???? This is the time to start kicking things up a notch and start focusing on the story while focusing on figuring out the words. Brains are starting to use more than one strategy to figure out words and thinking about the story. There has been a lot of talk about what goes on in storiesthe how and why. Now we are encouraging children to start doing this on their own as they read. The books now have little repetition and patterns, which requires more thinking and using all that the brain has to offer. There is simply more going on in the story, which requires the child to recall more when telling what happened in the story and compare and contrast events in order to get the main idea of the story. Whew!! That’s a lot!! There is more conversation in the stories so the reader has to navigate who is talking when while figuring out the story. Sentences are longer and more complex. In terms of sounds, students are dealing with all parts of the word. Now there are all of those weird spellings such as “night”, all kinds of endings to watch out for, and contractions. Basically it is all in there somewhere and now your child has to dig it out!!

 

 

What is your child learning here?

1. Read increasingly more difficult words using the strategies and word parts previously learned.

      What you can say:

  • You read the consonant letter (beginning of the word) and the next part. Now move on to the next.
  • Did you check across the word to make sure all parts are correct?
  • Move your eyes across the word checking part.
  • What did you do to help yourself?

2. Use parts from known words to read unknown words.

      What you can say:

  • You know a word that rhymes with this so you can read this new word.
  • Take a closer look at this part (a certain part that rhymes with a Word Wall word).
  • Use a word you know to help you.

3. Beginning to check if what is read matches the page independently as soon as the mistake happens. Some rereading and skipping to go on may be necessary.

      What you can say:

  • Read this again and see if you can fix this word before you read on. (point to the tricky word)
  • You reread and fixed this word. What helped you?
  • Something wasn’t quite right. Go back and see if you can find it.
  • You fixed this word immediately. Tell me what happened.

4. Use more than one strategy to figure out words and what is going on in the story, check to make sure that what is read makes sense and sounds right. The number one rule is that stories need to makes sense!!

      What you can say:

  • This is like another story we’ve read. Which one?
  • You are thinking about the story are you checking the pictures?
  • You are checking the picturesare you thinking about the story?
  • What do you know that can help you here?
  • Go back to the beginning of the sentence, think about what is going on in the story, then predict what the word might be.
  • Think about what’s going on in this part to figure out what that word means.
  • What does that mean?

5. Retell and summarize the story making sure that the story events are in order. By doing this the child can make comments about the story and make those inferences (combining what you know with what the story said in order to come up with a new idea). This is the meat of reading!!

      What you can say:

  • Let’s think about the title and look back to help us think about what happened in the story.
  • Retell the story. Your child can use “Beginning, Middle, and Ending” or the 5ws (who, did what, when where, and why).
  • Is that a “big” event in the story or a “little” detail?
  • What happened in the story?
  • What was the book about?
  • Notice how I talk about this part of the story to show why it is funny, happy, sad, etc.
  • What picture did you have in your mind that helped you to think about what happened in this part of the story?
  • Can you ask yourself a question such as, “Did I have anything happen to me like this character?”
  • Watch how I find information in the story (or pictures) to support my idea about this story “prove it”.

6. Read with more fluency and some expression as the story is reread. Your child is reading more and more like a professional. Can you believe how fancy your child sounds?

      What you can say:

  • Listen to me read it with voices and now you try.
  • Use your voice to change the character to show me that someone is happy, sad, mad, etc.
  • Let’s read the story using different voices.
  • Make reading sound like you are telling a story.