Level C

Level C

 

C is for Come and Sound Out the Words!!

Now that your child has worked so hard on matching the print to the words that she says it is time to really commit to ways to figure out those pesky words that are not clearly in the pictures. One way is to sound out the words and find little parts that you know (aka “the First Grade Way”) and another is to use the meaning and events in the story. The pictures now will start to be less obvious and there will be more words on a page that relate to the story and not as much to the pictures. There is still a great need to have the child point to the words and especially to the first letter in order to get your mouth ready to say the word. Eventually, your child will begin to slide their finger under the word to check the beginning and ending letters while thinking about the story, looking at the pictures, and finding the folder in her head to use what she knows. Your child has been learning new words so it is time to use those words in reading. This is the beginning of a beautiful melting of all of the strategies.

 

What is your child learning here?

1. Use some of the letters in a word along with meaning and how sentences should sound to figure out a word. The child first uses the beginning letter and then progresses to using the final letter.

What you can say:

  • Use the first letter of the word to help you.
  • Check the picture and use the first letter of the word to help you.
  • Think about what’s happening in the book right now and use the first letter of the word to help.
  • Does that look right and make sense?
  • Expect and compliment slowing down to solve a word, then picking up speed again.

2. Make and return sweep (go to the next line) on more than one line of print.

3. Read known words in text automatically.

        What you can say:

  • What word(s) do you know from your brain?
  • Expect and compliment when a child instantly recognition of easy high frequency words when reading.

4. Use the pattern of the text as a source of information to assist in reading the book.

        What you can say:

  • Watch how I read and listen for the pattern because that helps me with the words.
  • Use the first part of the sentences to predict the next word(s).
  • Notice the repeating words/patterns in the story.
  • How does this story go?

5. Begin to start using strategies together: making sure that it makes sense and sounds right and looks right, to use the folder in your head, and make predictions.

        What you can say:

  • Notice how I make a prediction about what will happen next using pictures, what is going on in the story, the folder in your head or personal experience.
  • What do you think will happen next?
  • Does the sound that you say match the beginning of the word? Is the sound that you are saying matching the last letter of the word?
  • Read it again and see if it sounds like how a book sounds.
  • Read it again and see if it makes sense.
  • Does that sound like how we talk?

6. Retell the story by making sure that the story events are in the right order and making inferences (combining what we know from our brain and what the book says to come up with a new idea… “making salad”)

        What you can say:

  • Let’s think about the title and look back through the pages to help us think about what happened in the story.
  • Can you predict what will happen after reading this far in the story?
  • What happened in the story?
  • What was the book about?
  • Watch how I find information in the story to support my ideas of the story.
  • Why did you say that? Prove it by finding the spot in the story where you thought of that.

7. Read with fluency. With repeated readings, the child should start to sound “like she is on TV” as we say in class. This means reading smoother. This probably does not happen on the first read and that is ok.

        What you can say:

  • Listen as I read this part like I am on TV. Now you try it.
  • Reread a part like you are on TV.
  • After re-readings, can you read this without your finger?